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10 Idioms With the Vocabulary of Autumn

Added by Tomasz H. 22 September 2014 in category: English, Learning tips, Lexicon

To squirrel something away

To hide something or store something in the way that a squirrel stores nuts for use in the winter.

I squirreled a little money away for an occasion such as this.


Turn over a new leaf

To reform and begin again.

I have made a mess of my life. I'll turn over a new leaf and hope to do better.




Take a leaf out of someone's book

To behave or to do something in a way that someone else would.

Don't take a leaf out of my book. I don't do it ...

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Lose vs Loose

Added by Tomasz H. 15 September 2014 in category: English, Learning tips, Lexicon

The words loose and lose are mixed up in writing. Look what they mean and then read a tip how to remember them.


Lose

to suffer the loss of, to miss

He's always losing his car keys.

She lost a lot of blood in the accident.

I win! You lose!

 


Loose

the opposite of tight or contained

Wear comfortable, loose clothing to your exercise class.

My shoes are loose.

There were some loose wires hanging out of the wall.

 

How to remember?

It's easy! Lose means the loss of, to miss. So when you don't know how ...

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UK & US - 10 Words That Mean Something Different

Added by Tomasz H. 8 September 2014 in category: English, Learning tips, Lexicon

Shorts

UK - refer to an alcoholic drink

US - refer to either short trousers or underwear

Bonnet

UK - the metal cover over the part of a car where the engine is

US - a hat for a baby that covers the head and ties under the chin, or a woman's hat

Rock

If you were tell someone to eat a rock:

UK - they’d be chewing a hard rock candy

US - they’d be chewing a stone from the ground

Saloon

UK - a car with seats for four or five people and a separate area at the back for bags and ...

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Accept vs Except

Added by Tomasz H. 2 September 2014 in category: English, Learning tips, Lexicon

These two English words are sometimes confused by native speakers. Let's learn more about them.

Accept

to agree to take something

Do you accept credit cards?

My offer was immediately accepted.

He asked me to marry him, and I accepted.

to say 'yes' to an offer or invitation

I've just accepted an invitation to the opening-night party.

I've been invited to their wedding but I haven't decided to accept.

Except

Except is a preposition that means "excluding."

She bought a gift for everyone except me.

The museum is open daily except Monday.

Except is also a ...

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